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It is the mission of the Delaware County Records Center

to effectively preserve, maintain, retrieve and store government records in an archival environment while supporting a records management program. This program will ensure the proper preservation of the county records under the laws of Ohio, within a conservative budget framework for the taxpayers.

 

Contact

2079 U.S. Hwy 23 N,
PO Box 8006
Delaware, Ohio 43015

Phone
(740) 833-2140

Hours

Monday – Friday

8am – 4:30pm

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Timeline Tuesday. This timeline of 1870-1871 below shows the events happening in Delaware County during the early 1870s. Many thanks to Ohio Wesleyan University, Delaware County Historical Society and City of Delaware for the Our Shared History information. ... See MoreSee Less

Timeline Tuesday. This timeline of 1870-1871 below shows the events happening in Delaware County during the early 1870s. Many thanks to Ohio Wesleyan University, Delaware County Historical Society and City of Delaware for the Our Shared History information.

In 1844, future First Lady Lucy Hayes moved with her widowed mother and two brothers to Delaware, Ohio, so her brothers could enroll at Wesleyan University. As a teenager, Lucy enrolled in the Cincinnati Wesleyan Female College and graduated in 1850.

Shortly thereafter, Lucy married Rutherford B. Hayes, who wrote about her in his diary, saying: “Intellect, she has, too, a quick sprightly one, rather than a reflective, profound one… She is a genuine woman, right from instinct and impulse rather than judgement and reflection.” When her husband became president in 1877, Lucy Webb Hayes became the first first lady to graduate from college.

Lucy used her education to advocate for causes throughout her life. She was staunchly opposed to slavery, supported the temperance movement by not serving alcohol in the White House, and demonstrated a commitment to community service. She also encouraged others to pursue an education and sponsored a scholarship for African-American students at the Hampton Institute, a historically Black university in Virginia.

Lucy’s quest for expanded education, especially for African Americans, was shared by her husband, and in his last year as president, Hayes sought to extend free and accessible education to all men who could vote. In 1880, President Hayes wrote, “To guard the sacred truth of equal rights we must go one step further. We should furnish to all our countrymen the means for that instruction and knowledge without which wise honest self-government is impossible.”

Following her time as first lady, Lucy Hayes became the president of the Woman’s Home Missionary Society of the Missionary Church (WHMS) after receiving encouragement from her college friend, Eliza Davis. As president of WHMS, she remained committed to advocating education reform and opportunities for immigrants and African Americans.

Lucy Hayes was an intellectual and moral first lady and this month we will share some lesser-known insights about her — who she was, and how she used her influence during her time at the White House.

Stay tuned as each month we examine a different first lady and their profound impact on the Executive Mansion and beyond.

Image: Library of Congress
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